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    Margins February meeting!

    For our February 27th meeting, Margins members discussed If You Could Be Mine by Sara Farizan. In the book, a young lesbian couple (Sahar and Nasrin) struggle to deal with their secret relationship in Iran, where homosexuality is punishable by death. Nasrin’s upcoming arranged marriage to a wealthy doctor becomes another pivotal conflict in the book.

    Everyone seemed to agree that the book shed light on the interesting “selective morality,” as Aynde called it, of the Iranian government. In Iran, people who experience same-sex attraction are encouraged to undergo sex reassignment surgeries to “fix” homosexual feelings. Sahar, the narrator of the story, debates undergoing this surgery to become male so that she can be with Nasrin with less fear of persecution.

    Although there were some interesting insights gained from the book, we had some criticism, too. Sahar’s obsession with being with Nasrin didn’t seem very well thought out. Of course, not having lived under the theocratic oppression of the ayatollahs, it’s hard to completely connect with Sahar’s reasoning.

    Harley mentioned contacting the author on Twitter to see if she could give any info on how to support LGBT people in Iran. Harley reported back about an organization called ORAM (Organization for Refuge, Asylum & Migration), which helps assist refugees who have fled countries due to persecution based on sexual orientation and gender identity. So, if you’re interested in helping out, feel free to visit their website at www.oraminternational.org.

    We also handed out our March pick, Bitter Eden by Tatamkhulu Afrika. Copies are available at the 1st-floor info desk. I’m sure we’ll have another fun discussion on March 26!

    PS: As a delicious addition to our meeting today, Harley brought us some great rainbow-colored cupcakes with sprinkles! Thanks, Harley! (We also came up with cool codenames, and if you come to our next meeting, we’ll give you one, too!)

     
     
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